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Monthly Archives: July 2012

67 years later

  

 

 

In MEMORIAM – 67 YEARS  LATER

Please read the little cartoon carefully, it’s powerful.
 Then read the comments at the end.

I’m doing my small part by forwarding this message. I hope you’ll consider doing the same.

 


It is now more than 60 years after the Second World War inEurope ended.  This e-mail is being sent as a memorial chain, in memory of the six million Jews, 20 million Russians, 10 million Christians and 1,900 Catholic priests who were murdered, massacred, raped, burned, starved and humiliated with the German and Russian Peoples looking the other way!

Now, more than ever, with Iraq, Iran, and others, claiming the Holocaust to be ‘a myth,’ it’s imperative to make sure the world never forgets, because there are others who would like to do it again,… and

WHY NOT?… TO READ IT AGAIN (…or for the firtst time…) “EL CRIMEN DE LA GUERRA”  by Juan Bautista Alberdi, (JB Alberdi also known as “EL APOSTOL DE LA PAZ”). –  If this magnificent book it is not as known as it should;  it is because was write in Spanish and 100 years ahead of time.. But to day you do not need to read Castellano (Spanish) as “THE CRIME OF WORD” by John Baptiste ALBERDI has been translated to English, (For several Universities of USA. It can be easily found at Google!

This e-mail is intended to reach 40 million people worldwide!

Join us and be a link in  the  memorial chain and help us distribute  it around  the world.

Please send this e-mail to people you know and ask them to continue the memorial chain.  
Please don’t just delete it.

It will only take you a minute to pass this along.  Thanks! 

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Juan Bautista Alberdi (1810 – 1888)

During the Mont Pèlerin Society meeting in Guatemala in 1991, Professor Leonard P. Liggio after exalting the contribution of John Adams (1797-1801), asked if there were any similar figures in Latin American history. He argued, “It is necessary to identify them, then re-examine their analysis of constitutions and institutions and show North and South America the value of their contributions. Classical liberals have an important Latin American research agenda before them.” Juan Bautista Alberdi (1810 – 1888) is one such founding father of Latin American liberties. If we do not have more freedoms in Latin America is because tyrants of yesterday and today have been conducting a continuous conspiracy of silence toward his work. Rather than being required reading across the continent, Alberdi’s works are largely ignored, even in his native country, Argentina.

Like many of his compatriots, Alberdi spent more time outside than inside Argentina. He was a towering intellectual figure. He was a member of the Economic Society in Paris, as well as the Historical Institute of the French Geographic Society; member of the Academy of History in Madrid; member of the Geographic Society of Berlin; Envoy and Minister of the Argentine Confederation to the Court of London. Alberdi was the greatest champion of economic freedom in South America. After the adoption of the Argentine Constitution in 1853, his native country saw a period of unprecedented economic development which lasted until the 1940’s. He warned us about the dangers of war in his magnificent essay, “The Crime of War” and of totalitarian governments in his, “The Omnipotence of the State is the Negation of Individual Liberty.”

As “The Crime of War” showed, Alberdi was not afraid to criticize his own country, even during war time. Though a great champion of the republican system of government, he was aware that not all people would use political freedoms properly. He wrote, “I do not share the un-experienced fanaticism, if not hypocritical, that calls for a full load of political liberties for populations that only know how to employ them to create its own tyrants.” He recommended beginning reforms with civil liberties, especially economic freedoms. Author of countless books, monographs and newspaper articles, and even musical works, he is one of the greatest champions of freedom ever to walk this world. It is fitting then that this first award, conferred to him by the Hispanic American Center for Economic Research and its panel of independent judges, is going to Alvaro Vargas Llosa. Latin America needs new Alberdis, and what better way than to call renewed attention to his contributions, and reward the new generation of authors who are courageously defending liberty in America with his same courage and sometimes even greater eloquence.

The winner of this first Alberdi award is one of the great standard-bearers of liberty today. He was born in Latin America, and has traveled the world disseminating the ideas of liberty. Historian and talented journalist, he has carried his ideas forward through the most prestigious North American, European and Latin media outlets. He has reached multitudes with his convictions that prosperity depends on one basic winning formula: give individuals the power to choose.

He is a member of the International Foundation for Liberty, Fundación Internacional para la Libertad, Director of the Center for Global Prosperity of the Independent Institute and, as a superb speaker and communicator he is in constant demand to address global economic and political issues. He has become one of the most recognized voices around the world promoting personal freedoms.

The winner this year has written several outstanding books and his most recent bestseller, Liberty for Latin America, won the 2006 Sir Antony Fisher Award given by the Atlas Economic Research Foundation. The Alberdi award is a new recognition added to Alvaro Vargas Llosa’s illustrious career in the world of ideas and the promotion of liberty.

Article published by DiarioExterior.com (Spain)

Article published by the Independent Institute (USA)

This is a true story.. 

Look at the B-17 and note how shot up it is: one engine dead, tail, horizontal stabilizer and nose shot up…ready to fall out of the sky.
Then realize that there is a German ME-109 fighter flying next to it.
Read the story below…(Painting done by an artist from the description of both pilots many years later.)Description:
Charlie Brown was a B-17 Flying Fortress pilot with the 379th Bomber Group at Kimbolton, England .
His B-17 was called ‘Ye Old Pub’ and was in a terrible state, having been hit by flak and fighters.
The compass was damaged and they were flying deeper over enemy territory instead of heading home to Kimbolton.
After flying the B-17 over an enemy airfield, a German ME-109 pilot, Franz Steigler, was ordered to take off and shoot down the B-17.
When he got near the B-17, he could not believe his eyes. In his words, he ‘had never seen a plane in such a bad state’.
The tail and rear section was severely damaged, and the tail gunner wounded.
The top gunner was all over the top of the fuselage.
The nose was smashed and there were holes everywhere.
Despite having ammunition, Franz flew to the side of the B-17 and looked at Charlie Brown, the pilot.
Brown was scared and struggling to control his damaged and blood-stained plane.
Description:Description:
ME-109 pilot Franz Steigler               B-17 pilot Charlie Brown.
Aware that they had no idea where they were going, Franz waved at Charlie to turn 180 degrees.
Franz escorted and guided the stricken plane to, and slightly over, the North Sea towards England.
He then saluted Charlie Brown and turned away, back to Europe.
When Franz landed he told the CO that the plane had been shot down over the sea, and never told the truth to anyone.
Charlie Brown and the remains of his crew told all at their briefing, but were ordered never to talk about it.
More than 40 years later, Charlie Brown wanted to find the Luftwaffe pilot who saved the crew.
After years of research, Franz was found. He had never talked about the incident, not even at post-war reunions.
They met in the USA at a 379th Bomber Group reunion, together with 25 people who were alive, all because Franz never fired his guns that day.
(L-R) German Ace Franz Steigler, artist Ernie Boyett, and B-17 pilot Charlie Brown.
Description:
When asked why he didn’t shoot them down, Steigler later said, “I didn’t have the heart to finish those brave men. I flew beside them for a long time. They were trying desperately to get home and I was going to let them do that. I could not have shot at them. It would have been the same as shooting at a man in a parachute.”
Both men died in 2008.This was back in the days when there was honour in being a warrior.
How times have changed…

http://on.aol.com/playlist/home-of-the-brave—full-series-144845/videoid=517410331?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl15%7Csec1_lnk2%26pLid%3D180580

October 8, 2010 – Margot B NewsLeave a comment Go to comments

 Mario Vargas Llosa, Miami Book Fair International, 1985

VARGAS LLOSA – LITERATURE NOBEL PRIZE

In their official announcement from Stockholm on Thursday morning, the Swedish Academy praised Mr. Vargas Llosa “for his cartography of the structures of power and his trenchant images of the individual’s resistance, revolt and defeat.” Alvaro Vargas Llosa, Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Prosperity, who has authored such notable works as Liberty for Latin America, which obtained the Sir Anthony Fisher International Memorial Award for its contribution to the cause of freedom in 2006, expressed the following sentiments:

The Nobel Prize for Literature awarded to my father, Mario Vargas LLosa, is great news for those of us who value freedom. His work explores the oppressive structures of power and the plight of the individual who rebels against them, [and} their impact has given some comfort, for decades, to those who struggle against authoritarian regimes.

Among the moving messages he and the family have received since the announcement are hundreds of letters of hope from Cubans and Venezuelans who see in him a symbol of what they stand for.

The cause of liberty in the Western Hemisphere has good reason to rejoice. The Independent Institute and its staff would like to join Alvaro in his praise, and extend their sincere appreciation to Mario for his tremendous contributions to the advancement of freedom in Latin America and across the world. For media inquiries, please contact Lindsay Boyd, Director of Communications, at 202-225-7722 or lboyd@independent.org. Mario Vargas Llosa Is Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature Washington, D.C, October 7, 2010— The Independent Institute joins our Senior Fellow, Alvaro Vargas Llosa, in congratulating his father, Mario Vargas Llosa, on receiving the 2010 Nobel Prize for Literature. In their official announcement from Stockholm on Thursday morning, the Swedish Academy praised Mr. Vargas Llosa “for his cartography of the structures of power and his trenchant images of the individual’s resistance, revolt and defeat.”

Alvaro Vargas Llosa, Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Prosperity, who has authored such notable works as Liberty for Latin America, which obtained the Sir Anthony Fisher International Memorial Award for its contribution to the cause of freedom in 2006, expressed the following sentiments:

The Nobel Prize for Literature awarded to my father, Mario Vargas LLosa, is great news for those of us who value freedom. His work explores the oppressive structures of power and the plight of the individual who rebels against them, [and} their impact has given some comfort, for decades, to those who struggle against authoritarian regimes.

Among the moving messages he and the family have received since the announcement are hundreds of letters of hope from Cubans and Venezuelans who see in him a symbol of what they stand for.

The cause of liberty in the Western Hemisphere has good reason to rejoice. The Independent Institute and its staff would like to join Alvaro in his praise, and extend their sincere appreciation to Mario for his tremendous contributions to the advancement of freedom in Latin America and across the world

For media inquiries, please contact Lindsay Boyd, Director of Communications, at 202-225-7722 or lboyd@indep

http://dprogram.net/2011/10/22/occupy-wall-street-simplified/

Published from Chicago, by Dr. Gaston Saint Martin (gsaintmartin@hotmail.com)  –  

She was a color, racial discriminated female, seamstress, humble, living in Montgomery, Alabama. She was a shy lady, who choose to remain seated, so everybody can stand up for our rights.  –   Shall we -(more educated professionals with our modern, powerful technical and academic organizations)- almost 60 years later, have  her internal strength and determination to stand up  for every one healthcare rights? –   The Supreme Court Ruling on Obama Care laws, on June 28, 2012; is just the beginning!

We have rights, but anything is “free” we have to go to court to fight for every one of them!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/december/1/newsid_4398000/4398912.stm

1955: Black woman challenges race law 

Mrs. Rosa Parks, refusal to give up her seat to a white man on the bus, provoke a boycott () in 1955, She died in 2005, 50 years after her famous boycott began. ([A])

A black woman has been arrested by police in Montgomery, Alabama, after refusing to give up her seat on the bus to a white person.

Mrs. Rosa Parks now faces a fine for breaking the segregation laws which say black Americans must vacate their seats if there are white passengers left standing.

It is not the first time Mrs. Parks, who is a seamstress, has defied the law on segregation.

In 1943 she was thrown off a bus for refusing to get on via the back door, which was reserved for black passengers. She became known to other drivers who sometimes refused to let her on.

Today Mrs. Parks left Montgomery Fair, the department store where she was employed doing repairs on men’s clothing, as usual.

She said she was tired after work and suffered aches and pains in her shoulders, back and neck.

When she got on the bus she realized the driver was the same man, James Blake, who had thrown her off twelve years before.

As more white people got on and the seats filled up, he asked her to give up her seat and she refused.

He threatened to call the police and she told him to go ahead.

She was subsequently arrested and charged with violating segregation law.

She will now appear in court on Monday 5 December.

Mrs. Parks is a youth leader of the local branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and her husband, Raymond, a barber, has taken part in voter registration drives.

Segregation laws

Between them the couple have worked for many years to improve the lot of black Americans in the southern United States where rigid segregation laws have been in force since the end of the Civil War in 1865.

Last year a group of professional black woman in Montgomery, the Women’s Political Council, protested to the mayor about segregation on the buses, warning him they were planning a boycott.

The NAACP has also tried to challenge the laws on segregation in the courts and Mrs Parks has been involved in raising money to defend a 15-year-old student, Claudette Colvin, who was removed from a bus in March of this year for refusing to give up her seat to a white man.

Five days later, thousands of black citizens boycotted the buses in Alabama – to mark the day Mrs Parks was due in court. She was fined $10 (the equivalent of about $70 in 2003), plus $4 costs.

She challenged the verdict and the NAACP decided to use her case as a test against city and state segregation laws.

Later that same evening, the young preacher Martin Luther King addressed a crowd of several thousand at Holt Street Baptist Church and called for the boycott to continue.

Nearly all Montgomery’s 40,000 black citizens took part in the bus boycott, which lasted for 381 days.

On 20 December the Supreme court upheld the decision of a lower court to end segregation on Alabama’s buses.

Mrs. Parks was sacked from her job and in 1957 left Montgomery for Detroit following harassment. She later became a special assistant to Democratic congressman John Conyers until her retirement in 1988

She died in October 2005 – an icon for the civil rights movement – almost exactly 50 years after her famous bus boycott began.

US civil rights icon Parks dies 

Rosa Parks, the black woman whose 1955 protest action in Alabama marked the start of the modern US civil rights movement, has died at the age of 92.

Mrs. Parks’ refusal to give up her seat to a white man on a bus prompted a mass black boycott of buses, organized by Baptist minister Martin Luther King Jr.

His protest movement brought about the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which outlawed racial discrimination in the US.

Mrs. Parks’ lawyer said she died in her sleep at her home in Detroit, Michigan.

It was revealed last year that she was suffering from progressive dementia.

She sat down in order that we all might stand up – and the walls of segregation came down,” civil rights leader Jesse Jackson said.

He said her legacy would never die, and added: “In many ways, history is marked as before, and after, Rosa Parks He said her legacy would never die, and added: “In many ways, history is marked as before, and after, Rosa Parks.

The nation lost a courageous woman and a true American hero,” Massachusetts Democrat Senator Ted Kennedy said. “Her quiet fight for equality sounded the bells of freedom for millions,” he said.

Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick said: “She’s an example for all people. For one, I would not be standing here but for her sitting down and standing up at the same time.”

I had a right

Mrs. Parks was a 42-year-old seamstress when she made history.

On 1 December 1955, Mrs. Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus in Alabama to a white man, defying the law. She was arrested and fined $14.

For years before her arrest, Mrs. Parks had been active with local civil rights groups, which were looking for a test case to fight the city’s segregation laws.

Speaking in 1992, Mrs. Parks said of her famous bus protest: “The real reason of my not standing up was I felt that I had a right to be treated as any other passenger. We had endured that kind of treatment for too long.”

She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996, and the Congressional Gold Medal, the nation’s highest civilian honor, three years later.

Democratic Congressman John Conyers, from whom she worked in Detroit from 1965 until she retired in 1988, described her as “an almost saint-like person”. – She was very humble, she was soft-spoken, but inside she had a determination that was quite fierce.”

_______________________________

One person can change the world: A changing display

We have reserved a space on a pillar in the north aisle of church for a photograph or icon of an inspiring person of recent years. A candle will burn beneath the image at appropriate times. Members of the congregation will choose who shall be commemorated in this way.

The first choice has received great welcome in Church, and has led to much conversation and discussion. She is Rosa Parks (1913 – 2005). Rosa Parks was born in Tuskegee, Alabama. In 1955 as an unknown black seamstress she sat down on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, on her journey home. She refused to surrender her seat to a white passenger. This led to her prosecution and a city-wide bus boycott by black citizens which lasted 381 days. She was found guilty amd fined and was dismissed from her work.

Her action changed the course of civil rights in the USA. She became a great campaigner for peace and justice, and received many honours.

Rosa Parks was a role model of courage in the face of injustice. She was a grass roots activist from a humble background. Her example inspires us to be prepared to sacrifice for the sake of our beliefs.

We will change the display every two months or so. You are welcome to nominate someone. We ask that the person not be a living person, and that they be Christian or at least encouraging or supportive of Christian faith. (Thus, for example, if he were no longer living the Dalai Lama would qualify). We will give priority to grassroots ‘saints’.


[A]boycott is an act of voluntarily abstaining from using, buying, or dealing with a person, organization, or country as an expression of protest, usually for political reasons. It can be a form of consumer activism.

Re-publicado desde Chicago por Gaston Saint Martin (gsaintmartin@hotmail.com) –

The photograph “Calle Corrientes” from 1936.

Horacio Coppola, whose black-and-white photographs of the cafes, side streets and neon-lit boulevards of Buenos Aires in the 1930s, and of ordinary objects like a typewriter and a doll, introduced avant-garde photography to Argentina, died on June 18 in Buenos Aires. He was 105.

His death was confirmed by Michael Hoppen, a gallery owner in London who deals in Mr. Coppola’s work. Mr. Hoppen donated a Coppola photograph to the Tate Modern museum in London, where it was put on display just a few weeks before Mr. Coppola’s death.

The Museum of Modern Art owns six of Mr. Coppola’s photographs, which aren’t currently on display, and hopes to obtain more for a show in 2015 of his work and that of the photographer Grete Stern, who was his first wife. “The museum has a directed a lot of attention toward the acquisition of work by Latin American artists, and Coppola is at the top of that list,” Sarah Meister, a photography curator at MoMA, said.

In 1930, the writer Jorge Luis Borges, a friend, launched Mr. Coppola’s career by using some of his photographs to illustrate a book about the poet Evaristo Carriego, according to Amanda Hopkinson, a literary translator and specialist on Latin American culture who teaches at City University London and the University of Manchester.

Mr. Coppola is not well known outside Argentina, but his works, particularly his nighttime images of Buenos Aires, are on par with those of more renowned photographers from his era, like George Brassaï, known for images of Paris at night, and Bill Brandt, celebrated for portraits and night scenes in London, Ms. Meister said.

One Coppola photograph at the Museum of Modern Art, perhaps his most noted, is “Egg and Twine,” taken in 1932 when he was studying at the Bauhaus in Berlin with the photographer and teacher Walter Peterhans. The picture is a still life of an egg in its shell, resting on a wood surface alongside a looping, curling length of twine. A print of it is hanging in the Tate.

“It is spectacular,” Ms. Meister said, adding: “The very close-up view was characteristic of work being done when Walter Peterhans was directing the photography program at the Bauhaus. The idea of describing surface textures and the quality of light in a uniquely photographic way was something Peterhans championed. This is a particularly well-accomplished example of that, in terms of the composition, the layering of light and dark. It’s a very shallow space, and yet the range of light is impressive.”

Mr. Hoppen said he had chanced on one of Mr. Coppola’s photographs at a gallery in Berlin around 2000 and was instantly captivated.

He tracked down Mr. Coppola and spent a week with him in Buenos Aires examining his work. Mr. Coppola, then in his 90s, still remembered where and how he had taken every picture, Mr. Hoppen said. He bought about 50 photographs — half of what Mr. Coppola had on hand — including night and day cityscapes, abstractions, nudes and the coronation of King George VI, the father of Queen Elizabeth.

“Nobody knew about him,” Mr. Hoppen said. “It was a strange sort of backwater.”

The photographs sell for an average of $6,200 to $7,800. Horacio Coppola was born in Buenos Aires on July 31, 1906, the youngest of 10 children. His parents, Italian immigrants, were well off, and he studied art, music, law and languages. He was about 20 when he began taking pictures.

He traveled to Europe in the 1920s and ’30s, and was excited by the modernist movement. Photography was coming into its own as an art form, with pictures being shot from odd angles and cropped for effect.

He met Ms. Stern in Germany; they married in London. There, he took portraits of famous artists, and worked on a book about Mesopotamian artifacts in the Louvre and the British Museum. The couple went back to Argentina in 1936. That year, he was commissioned to photograph Buenos Aires for its 400th anniversary, and produced evocative streetscapes that captured the romance, vitality and squalor of a great city.

He and Ms. Stern had a daughter, Silvia, and a son, Andres. They later divorced. In 1959 Mr. Coppola married Raquel Palomeque, a pianist. Ms. Stern, Ms. Palomeque and the two children died before him.